What You Should Know About Code Enforcement.

Code Enforcement is serious business in New Orleans. An Administrative Judgment can cause you to have:
Your property seized and sold at public auction. JohnMenszer-0296
Daily fines of hundreds of dollars per day.
A lien filed against your property.
The fine and penalties added to your tax bill.

In New Orleans, the Municipal Code was amended as of April 10, 2014, making occupied and vacant property subject to the “Minimum Property Maintenance Code”. See this link to the Municode website, specifically Sections 6 and 26:
https://library.municode.com/index.aspx?clientId=10040

It is a violation of the Code to have:
Weeds in excess of 18 inches.
Substantially peeling, flaking or chipped exterior paint.
A gutter that discharges water onto a neighbor’s property.
A window that doesn’t operate or has a substantially cracked glass.
A screen with holes or breaks.
Peeling, chipped or flaking interior paint.
An inoperative or unlicensed motor vehicle.
A hot tub or pool without a 6 foot high fence with self-latching gate.

The Code Enforcement process can be initiated by an inspector or by a neighbor’s call to 311. At the hearing, the owner can present evidence and photographs to show work in progress. The Code Enforcement Bureau has discretion to continue the hearing, if substantial progress is shown, or render a Judgment. If found in violation the Bureau will issue a Notice of Judgment and levy a fine which is subject to stiff penalties beginning in 30 days if the fine is not paid. After 30 days the Judgment is recorded in the Land Records Division of the Clerk of Court (formally Notarial Archives and the Mortgage Office.) The Bureau has discretion whether to have the Sheriff of Orleans seize and sell the property at public auction.

The Owner is best served by bringing the property into full compliance. The administrative process allows appeals of a Judgment to Civil District Court, but only a suspensive appeal, which requires the posting of a bond, will protect the property from seizure and sale. Paying the fine (and penalty) will terminate the current case, but the property is subject to being re-cited for violations. Repeat offenders may have increased penalties.

As I said before, “Code Enforcement is serious business in New Orleans.”